Anabel González

Here I’m again with my words post.

As I told you in the other post some of these words are new for me and other I don’t know if I used them correctly or are still used.

Toyed: meaning in the dictionary: was toying with the idea of writing a book: THINK ABOUT, consider, flirt with, entertain the possibility of; informal  kick around.

I used it like this: “I toyed with my dream for a long time, trying to make sense of it”

Creep in: enter surreptitiously; "he sneaked in under cover of darkness"; "in this essay, the author's personal feelings creep in" [syn: sneak in]
I used it here: “The sun began to creep in the room indicating that a new day had begun”

Endure: suffer without complaint, tolerate; continue on in spite of difficulty .

I used it here: “The noise in my head began again. It was terribly annoying, but I could endure it.”

Cease: stop, halt.

I used it here: The noise in my head ceased

 

Unknown : someone or something which is not known; someone or something that is unfamiliar; mathematical factor which is not known .

I used it like this: I had so many unknowns to answer”

 

Flit: fly; flutter; dart; move quickly; change location; escape in secret


I used it like this: “A smile of satisfaction flitted across my face”

Have a great Monday!!

 

PS: Carlos did his Tae kwon do exam and did it perfect. I’m very proud of him for being able to do it in front of people.


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12 Responses
  1. tracy_d74 Says:

    YAY! Congrats Carlos!!
    All of the usages looked great. i would change the creep in sentene to: The sun crept in the room, marking a new day. (But that's me.)


  2. yes, it reads smoother like that!
    Thank you!!:)


  3. All of them can be used in that way. I agree with the previous commenter, though, and think the "creep in" sentence seems a little stiff, very formal. I think I would go with tracy_d74's sentence. :-)
    The only other change I would make is "I had so many unknowns to answer". It works, but I think I would say, "There were so many unknowns to consider". You could also use "factor": "There were so many unknown factors to consider." I think that sentence seems a little less... awkward. :-) That's when it gets tricky, knowing what just SOUNDS right, you know?


  4. robinellen Says:

    I like them all, though #1 has a slightly different connotation, in my mind. I think I usually assume that someone 'toys' with something they want to do, like an action they hope to take. But that doesn't mean it can't be used as you're using it. When I read the sentence, I thought *contemplated* might be a stronger word, but that's only my take on it :)


  5. Yes knowing what sound right is the msot difficult for me.
    Thank you very much for your help!


  6. contemplated sounds great too. Mmm I am going to try it in the complete paragraph.
    Thank you!



  7. writerjenn Says:

    Toyed: Yes. "toyed with my dream" is a little different from what we usually hear (it would usually be something like, "she toyed with her fork" or "you're just toying with me"), but I think you can toy with a dream, and I like the originality!
    Creep in: Yes, although I would say "creep into the room" rather than "creep in the room"
    Endure: Yes, correct. Actually, the fact that the noise was terribly annoying is better to show rather than tell. Or even skip it: "The noise in my head began again. All I could do was endure it."
    Cease: Yes. It's rather formal, though.
    Unknown: Yes; you probably don't even need the phrase "to answer."
    Flit: Yes.
    Yay Carlos!


  8. musingaloud Says:

    Looks very good. I'm so impressed you are learning all this on your own with a dictionary! You're amazing. And congrats on Carlos!


  9. YEI!! and I got sparkles too!:)


  10. I like the changes you are suggesting in the endure phrase! Thank you!!:)


  11. Ok thank you very much! (now I'm blushing)
    I am learning it with 4 dictionaries. My husband bought me a license for a program called babylon that you can add a lot of dictionaries so when I put a word it appears the meanings of many dictionaries. It also makes translations, but not very good ones.:)


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